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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
relations committee, i think a great deal of what good foreign policy about is building personal relationships and building personal relationships with leaders around the world. and the one thing that i've really observed, senator kerry, of you is that you have done that. and we have had so many of these private meetings across over there in the capitol and in the small foreign relations room and i could just feel with meeting with all these leaders, the tremendous respect that they have for you and the ability you are going to have to build on that to make an excellent secretary of state. so i'm very excited about this opportunity for you and i want, in my first question here i wanted to focus on mexico and central america. during the last decade, relations between the united states and mexico have strengthened as a result of our shared security goals relating to the initiative. and one of the pillars of that initiative includes judicial reform and you know this very well. however, the federal government and many of the mexican states have yet to pass legislation which would cha
opens more than 200,000 jobs to women. >> ifill: then, we turn to u.s. foreign policy, as confirmation hearings begin for secretary of state nominee john kerry, two former national security advisers stephen hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against unlivable wages and working conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broad
boot on foreign-policy. bradley shear worker rights in the workplace. >> as secretary i have no greater priority responsibility. as i have said many times, i take responsibility. nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to be the state department -- to leave the state department safer and more secure. it meant moving quickly to respond to the immediate crisis, but also to further protect our people in high threat areas across the region and the world. host: we will get your reaction this morning to hillary clinton's testimony yesterday. we do expect misses clinton on capitol hill again today as john kerry has his hearing to replace her. for the first 45 minutes, we will get your reaction to the testimony. what's being written and on television. this is your chance to weigh in on what happened yesterday. democ here is the front page of "the washington times." the headline says "tears and rage on benghazi." we begin with an exchange between the secretary and senator ron johnson. [video clip]journal > >> do you agree that a simple phone call -- that was a piece of in
tonight. the fight against al qaeda and militant islam in africa. one of the many foreign policy challenges for the commander and chief's second term. the state department today confirmed that last week's hostage standoff at a gas plant in algeria did kill three americans: according to the prime minister. two canadians and team of explosive experts who had planned to blow up the place. the prime minister also said the military operation to free those hostage resulted in the deaths of dozens of prisoners. you will recall last week the militants stormed the facility near the lib i can't be border. according to the al gearian they claim it was pay back for algeria letting french jets use airspace to attack infamous fighters in neighboring mali. jonathan hunt has this in new york tonight. jonathan, last week we had a lot of criticism of the algerians. there seems to be a change in tone now. >> yeah, very much so. last week the british and japanese governments in particular were very critical of what they saw as an overly aggressive and heavy handed response by the algerian security
at the kerry nomination and foreign policy challenges he'll face, with two men who've served as national security adviser to the president. zbigniew brzezinski held that position with president carter. he's now a counselor at the center for strategic and international studies. stephen hadley served under president george w. bush. he's currently a senior adviser at the united states institute of peace. welcome to both of you. first, zbigniew brzezinski, your thoughts on john kerry as nominee for secretary of state? >> i think he's an absolutely top-notch choice. very good. experienced, solid, energetic with a broad vision and with a strong focus on trying to stabilize those parts of the world that are especially dangerous. i think he's practical, intelligent, well informed. >> brown: stephen hadley? >> he's in a way spent his whole life preparing for this job and it's good he did because he takes in the a very challenging time and i think he's going to have a lot of challenges before him. i think one of them is to prioritize where he's going to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he s
relationships on behalf of the presidents and the furtherance of american foreign policy. i'll have some questions later on policies and your views, including how you explain to world leaders how you could have been rooting for the boston red sox instead of what the world knows as the new york yankees as the team of the world. but let me say, mr. chairman, it's been a pleasure working with you and continuing to work with you for the issues that you champion over the years. fighting global terrorism, preventing the spread of biological weapons, fighting for human rights against hiv/a.i.d.s. around the world. if your new role, should you be confirmed, and i know you will, your portfolio will be greatly expanded from securing our embassies and protecting our overseas personnel and through cooperation where possible and isolation where necessary as in the case of iran. of course, it goes without saying that you have truly been a world leader in one of the most consequential issues of our time, climate change. it heartens me to know that you will be our voice to the world. whatever challenges
's foreign policy position. he sailed he wouldn't pick him as secretary of state because they have a very different philosophy, bill. bill: we'll see if she mentions some of the more fiery hot spots on the globe today, she's been traveling a million miles, isn't that what she said yesterday. >> reporter: we heard a lot about her traveling more than a million miles as secretary of state. those of who who like hillary clinton were applauding her for her service and her going all over the world and others wanted to ask tough questions about benghazi. martha: i see elizabeth war warren at the table there. is she playing a roam? we are seeing new faces in the senate. >> reporter: i think she has an introduction here. do you want to listen in. martha: sure. >> i know will continue in the tradition of john quincy adams and christian herder as great secretaries from the commonwealth of massachusetts. although john learned more about diplomacy overseas and in the senate he'll be the first to tell you that massachusetts is a great teacher of diplomatic skills. whether it was negotiating his way to
of fundamental issues for a president, guns and keeping the government gorg and fighting for his foreign policy team. it's not like he's looked for a fight. let's face it, newtown forced everybody to deal with this. >> newtowns changed everything. >> i don't think he's looking for a fight. i think he's found one. >> i agree with you. i think since the election this has been the best period where the president has had in the last four years. a lot of things have come together for him. he's had sync with the country and the country is in sync for him. the quer for the gop, are you prepared for this barack obama? you didn't seem to be able to handle the first one. are you prepared for this one who now has the kind of wind in his sails going into a second term that can be very, very good for him in terments of at least in the first six or so months laying down some hard lines for the gop to cross. i think they can, but they're going to have to make the argument, you know, from a principled position, get off the crazy noise we have -- >> don't they have -- >> distract -- >> on an issue we just talke
choice to carry forward the obama administration's foreign policy, and i urge his speedy confirmation. >> and at her side one of her toughest critics on benghazi. today recounting how he and fellow vietnam veteran john kerry worked together to normalize relations with vietnam in the 1990s. >> helping to establish a relationship with vietnam that serves american interests and values rather than one that remained meyered many mutual resentment and bitterness is one of my proudest accomplishments as a senator. i expect it is one of john's as well. witnessing almost daily his exetch lear statesmanship is one of the highest privileges i've had here. >> kerry's first appearance on the senate foreign relations panel as an activist. some things don't change. >> how do you ask a man to be the last man to die in vietnam? >> i'm tired of -- >> when i first came to washington and testified, i was testifying as part of the group of people who came here to have their voices heard, and that is, above all, what this place is about, so i respect, i think, the woman who was voicing her concerns about t
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
once, he barely mentions economic growth or the private sector. think about foreign policy. he doesn't mention terrorism, jihaddism. a decade of war is ending. has anyone told the jihadists in algeria or the taliban in afghanistan? he didn't mention afghanistan, he didn't mention iran. how many times in his first term did president obama try to establish his bona fides as a tough guy by saying he would not let iran get nuclear weapons? not a word about it and, indeed, almost the opposite, that engage empty's the way -- engagement's the way to handle problem abroad. jon: we are heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends. >> it really struck me. two things about it. first of all, we would not have won the peace of after world war ii if we hadn't win the wore. he got out of iraq, he's getting us out of afghanistan or, he seems not to want to confront jihadists or the iranian regime, so the idea you can win a peace without winning the war is delusional. but also that sentence, in particular he says they didn't just win the wa
. the important foreign-policy issue of benghazi. it was something we were talking about a month ago, but it faded into the background. everybody will be watching tomorrow. it is a big deal to have the secretary of state come in. everyone wants to hear what she has to say about this. she becomes less of a focus because she's leaving, some say. but it will be really important hearing. the group publicans' want a special committee formed to investigate the because the issue, but they did not get that. all we will crb hearings where we get a picture of it from people who were heading the operation. so her parents will be very big tomorrow. guest: more broadly, on national security, we will enter the beginning of confirmation hearings for john kerry as secretary of state, chuck hagel as secretary of defense. consideration of our military strategy, our military spending, how we project american power as we complete a winding down of the war in afghanistan. it is really going to be the end of a post-9/11 period in national security policy, with the policy going for it from there still unsettled. guest:
some key lines that might be a sign of what's to come in his second term foreign policy. let's listen to a bit of what the president said yesterday. >> we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. our citizens seared by the memory of those we have lost know too well the price that is paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm, but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war, who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends, and we must carry those lessons into this time as well. we will show the courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peacefully, not because we are naive about the dangers we face, but because engagement can more durably lift suspicion and fear. >> that's what i like about president obama and one of the many reasons i like him, because of that. could that be an olive branch the president might extend to nations such as, let's say it, iran, and if so, will they respond in tehran? richard engel is
for a secretary of state and for the united states generally in foreign policy have not waned. they have probably increased. in libya and benghazi and secretary clinton tried to make this point and senator kerry as well that the funding for all of these things is -- it's a fine it amount of money, and it's shrinking at the moment. the difficulty of a world that remains kredably complex, probably more complex, with our somewhat increasingly limited ability to sort of address every hotspot that we like, it's a very, very difficult challenge for any secretary of state. john kerry or anyone else. we saw it with hillary clinton. yes, she had successes clearly, but she also centeringled at times too. i don't know if it's a job no one wants. john kerry clearly wants it. it's not an easy job, by any measure. >> in fact, john kerry has want that job all his life. susan page, he even got emotional today talking about his father, who is a foreign service officer and how he was raised az foreign service kid traveling around the world. something that was held against him when he was running for president in 2
with president george w. bush and foreign policy will be happening in the second term. >> the first thing that strikes me on a day like today is what a wonderful celebration this is with our democracy. the peaceful transfer of power. of course president obama is being affirmed again, but we look at our institutions. you see the supreme court justice swear in the president. it's a wonderful thing and it's something that when you've traveled around the world, not every country can take this moment for granted. when the will of the people is confirmed and affirmed the way we're going to see today. >> the president is speaking to the world, he's speaking to the united states, he's speaking to the people in washington and he's speaking to republicans. what does he need to say to republicans? >> on inaugural day, it is really the high point for any presidency, i think, because after that we start to get back to our regular criticism, and we did this wrong and that wrong, and so i would hope the president would use the opportunity to say i've won the election, but this
. then he becomes a lame duck and then you have to start shifting more and more toward foreign policy, traveling around the world. on the domestic agend ahe has a very short time before he becomes a lame duck. >> the president's inaugural address tomorrow is a tradition that dates back to george washington in 1789. the president plans to look ahead more than back in the speech. let's get some insight from the wall street journal columnist. what are your thoughts on what the president needs to say in order to be most effective, to best set himself up, going into the next four years? >> reporter: well, i don't know. we will find out what he and his aides have decided about that, just about 24 hours from now. i think a second inaugural address is always a little bit difficult, you know? a first inaugural, everybody's new and excited and it's like superman coming out of the telephone booth and showing you the big "s" on his chest. a second inaugural is like, hi, it's me again. so you want to -- you want to try to make it fresh and new anyway. and i think this president has a real opportun
on counts issues, ensuring the diplomacy is an essential part of our country's foreign policy. and your tireless efforts to elevate women and girls' rights is without comparison. you have strengthened our state department, made it better today than when you arrived. as ranking member on the africa subcommittee, i am especially appreciative of the attention you've given to the 54 congratulations -- nations of africa. while aftercation ca may lose one -- while africa may lose one of its champions at the state department, i trust africa will not be far from your thoughts and will remain a top priority in your exueture -- in your future work. i also want to associate my comments with congressman sherman who said that it's unfortunate that this is the last time we will hear from you. so i want to focus my time on moving us forward and asking your advice. you made reference in your testimony about best value contracts. and you mentioned, i believe, several nations where best value contracts are not used. and in thinking about africa and the instability and a number of nations in northern afri
of qaddafi was one of the great successes of their foreign policy. this was the origin of the phrase, leading from behind in the overthrow of qaddafi, yet obviously you have to judge a policy by its aftermath as well as people have criticized the bush administration for what happened in iraq after the overthrow of saddam hussein. libya was not just another embassy. it was not iceland. it wasn't france. it was a very dangerous place, and the fact that the administration would tout libya as a success, even as our ambassador in libya was describing the descent into kay yos that the -- chaos the country was seeing. the growth of terrorist cells and training camps, nothing was being done to affect security but nothing was being done to recognize the failure and the risk to american interests more broadly being reflected by the chaos growing in libya. jon: the administration asserted that the deaths of our ambassador and others resulted from this protest over the online video. the secretary was asked about that today and she got pretty angry, said what does it matter why this thing started. your th
of the second administration. second term. >> foreign policy is your expertise. three weeks ago we would not have thought of africa being a threat to americans. what concerns you about that situation? what can the president do about going forward? >> i think if we're talking about mali and places around mali, the president should support those who are going to lead the french. the french have a unique relationship and interest in mali. i think we should support them to the extent we can. they're one of our nato allies and they have been a friend of ours. but we have to keep our eye on the places. i don't think it will require american soldiers on the ground, but we have to realize that al qaeda has been badly diminished. let's not overlook the success we have had. but it doesn't mean it's gone away. and it doesn't mean that every al qaeda cell is getting ready to attack the united states of america. they're doing other things in the region as well. so be vigilant. help our friends. i don't think there's a need for a commitment of american troops. >> mr. secretary, thank you so much for b
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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